Jacobson, Julius & Harshberger

For a free initial consultation, call us today: 717-260-3127

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Due to precautions related to COVID-19, we have expanded our options for remote consultations. Please contact our office to discuss whether a full phone consultation or video conferencing via Zoom is appropriate for your situation. Click here to access Zoom.

Jacobson, Julius & Harshberger

For a free initial consultation, call us today:

Make A Payment

Due to precautions related to COVID-19, we have expanded our options for remote consultations. Please contact our office to discuss whether a full phone consultation or video conferencing via Zoom is appropriate for your situation. Click here to access Zoom.
Jacobson, Julius & Harshberger

For a free initial consultation, call us today: 717-260-3127

|

Make A Payment

Due to precautions related to COVID-19, we have expanded our options for remote consultations. Please contact our office to discuss whether a full phone consultation or video conferencing via Zoom is appropriate for your situation. Click here to access Zoom.
Jacobson, Julius & Harshberger

For a free initial consultation, call us today:

Make A Payment

Experienced lawyers, driven to succeed on your behalf.

How online life can affect divorce proceedings

People in Pennsylvania and across the country are fully emerged in the era of social media. They are sometimes inclined to make a public display of their personal lives online. When couples are going through a divorce, posts on social media could backfire if they reveal information that doesn’t match what they say in court. They are advised to keep certain types of information off of social media and even out of personal emails.

Financial information is used by judges to decide on the issues of spousal and child support. Social media posts that suggest that someone has more money than they claim, such as ones about expensive purchases or vacations, could be used as evidence in divorce court.

Judges are also concerned with the personal behavior of divorcing spouses, especially when it comes to determining child custody. A divorcing parent could damage their chances of a favorable child custody outcome if online posts or emails suggest poor parenting skills. Criticizing the other spouse is often viewed by judges negatively, especially when it is done in front of the couple’s children. Negative online posts about the other spouse could wind up becoming a factor in a divorce case.

Looking online for new romance while going through the end of a marriage is cautioned against by many observers. Signing up for a dating site, for example, could be construed as infidelity. Many attorneys will thus advise their clients who are contemplating filing for a divorce to be extremely discreet when it comes to posting on Facebook or Instagram.

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